Mary’s X Files, December 2016

Using Photos on macOS Sierra for People Recognizing
~iCreate
When you’re not using the Photos app, leave it open so that it has time to scan all your images for recognizable people.

Set up and use Magnifier on iOS 10
~iCreate
Read anything by pressing the Home button three times. There will be times when the fine print in a document or on a product is hard to read, and this is a particular problem for those with less than ideal eyesight. Fortunately, Apple has come up with a solution that is not only very quick to use, but which will render any difficult object or text in a magnified fashion that can be read instantly. The process for setting it up is very easy and it is even easier to use, with the option being available any time you find yourself struggling to see or read something. You may find yourself using it every day.

1. Find the settings – Go to Settings>General>Accessibility and look for the Magnifier option. As with many settings in iOS, it is not easy to find unless you are specifically looking for it.
2. Set it up – Tap the button next to Magnifier at the top to enable the feature and then do the same for Auto-Brightness if you want the camera to sense the ambient light conditions.
3. Nothing changes – The feature can be enabled and you will see no change at all until you triple-press the Home button. In day to day use, it is there waiting for you until you need to use it.
4. Magnify something – You can now magnify any object with a Home button triple-click and you will also be able to take a photo of it. The image can be blurred unless captured for referencing after.

Copy & Paste between Devices with Universal Clipboard
~iCreate
You can send text and images anywhere using Universal Clipboard. Provided your iOS device and Mac are signed in to the same iCloud account, you will be able to take advantage of the new Universal Clipboard feature to copy and paste across devices. You must have macOS Sierra installed on your Mac, and iOS 10 on your iPhone or iPad, and provided Bluetooth is enabled on both devices it should just start working with no problems. Simply copy something on one device in the usual way and then past it on the other. it really could not be more straightforward.

To use Universal Clipboard, the two devices must be within local range of each other, but they can be connected to different Wi-Fi networks.

iOS – Activate Larger Dynamic Type
~iCreate
It’s a fact of life that our eyes deteriorate over time. Looking at small computer screens all day does us no favors at all. Did you know that you can increase the font size in iOS to stop you straining? Here’s how to activate it.

1. Larger text – In the Settings app, tap on General and then Accessibility. Navigate to Larger Text and tap on that option.
2. Activate feature – Before you do anything else, you need to flick the Larger Accessibility Sizes switch to green. This lets you adjust the text size via the slider.
3. Drag the slider – Now it’s up to you how big you want the system font to go. Drag the slider until you’re happy – the text on the page will update as a live preview.

macOS Sierra – Undo Closure of Tabs in Safari
~MacFormat
I like some of the simplest tricks in Safari, such as the ability to undo the closure of more than just one tab by pressing command+z multiple times.

macOS Sierra -Annotate a Photo in Photos App
~MacFormat
Double-click a photo so it fills the app’s window. Then, click the “Edit Photo” button (its icon is one of the three sliders) at the top, right of the window. Click Extensions at the bottom of the list of tools down the right of the photo. Then, click “Markup”.

You can write text, add shapes or symbols, draw freehand, or even add a magnifying glass effect to draw attention to an area. Click “Save Changes” when you’re done. To remove annotations, edit the photo and click “Revert to Original”.

iOS Uses for Siri
~iCreate
1. Use the speaker – When making a call using Siri, you can enable the speaker to make the experience truly hands-free. Saying “Call Jo on speaker” will initiate the call through the speaker.
2. Deal with settings – Many people do not realize that Siri can access most iOS settings. For example, if you say “Open Mail settings”, you will be taken straight to the area you need.
3. Take a chance – When you want luck to play a part in a decision, you can say “roll dice” or “flip a coin” to Siri and he/she will offer a random result.
4. Correctly pronounce names – If Siri pronounces a name incorrectly, you can say “that’s not how you pronounce…” You can then say it again and Siri will offer alternative options for you to choose.
5. Deal with dates – Asking Siri when a public holiday is will bring up the date you need, but you can also say some like “How many days until…” followed by a date.

Mary’s X Files, November 2016

How to use and customize Shake to Undo on iPhone and iPad
~iMore
How do I use the Shake to Undo feature on my iPhone and iPad? It’s enabled by default, but you can always turn it off in your settings!

Have you ever tried to delete a giant paragraph of text you just typed on your iPhone or iPad? Good news: You don’t have to hold backspace and watch all the letters and words disappear, one by one. You can simply shake your iPhone. Shake to Undo can save precious time and simply gets rid of what you just wrote, so you can start fresh with a blank slate.

Check a Folder’s Location in Finder on a Mac
~MacFormat
Turning on the path bar (View > Show Path Bar) shows the current folder’s location across the bottom of its window. Double-click a folder in the bar to jump to it, command-click to open it in a new window, or drag and drop items onto one to move them there.

Siri, find my car (in iOS 10)
~iMore
If your car has Bluetooth or CarPlay, Maps can automatically display it on a map, along with when you last turned the car off and space for notes and a photo of your garage level, if you’re the kind who forgets such things. (I am.)

You can also ask Siri “Where’s my car?” if you want a quick and precise location, and even get directions to it.

How Can I Check Installed Apple Security Updates
~MacFormat
Choose Command+”About This Mac” and click “System Report”. In the left pane, under Software, select “Installations”, then click the “Install Date” header twice to order updates with the most recent first. Security updates include Gatekeeper Configuration Data.

How Do I Restart my Mac in Safe Mode?
~MacFormat
Shut down, wait 10 seconds, then press the Power button to start up. At the startup sound, hold down the shift key until you see the Apple logo and progress bar. Check in System information that Boot Mode says ‘Safe’.

What Happens to your Music if you Cancel your Subscription to iTunes Match?
~iCreate
Before canceling your iTunes Match subscription, ensure you’ve downloaded all music stored in the cloud to your Mac. One of the biggest benefits of iTunes Match is the opportunity to convert your music to a higher bitrate of 256kbps; everything matched in the cloud is available to redownload at this bitrate. It does not automatically redownload though, which is why it’s important to download all music stored in the cloud.

How to Forward a Text Message on iPhone
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
Can text messages be forwarded? Why, yes, they can! If you’ve ever accidentally sent a message to the wrong person or wanted to pass a message you received from one person on to someone else, you can easily forward texts from the Messages app. When you forward a text message on iPhone, you can also add your own comments before sending it on. This is a great way to forward pictures you receive in messages that you want to share with friends. Here’s how to forward a text message on iPhone.

To forward a text:
- Open the conversation in Messages containing the text you want to pass on.

- Double tap or press and hold on the the body of the message.

- Tap More and all the messages will shift to the right. Small circles will appear to the left of each text, with the message you’ve tapped on already selected. Tap on the circle next to any additional messages you want to forward.

Mary’s X Files, October 2016

Set a Default View in Finder on a Mac
~MacFormat
Finder can present the contents of your Mac’s storage in four ways – Icon, List, Column and Cover Flow views. Switch between them using command+1 through to command+4. Each view offers a degree of customization: press command+J to change how the current view displays the folder you’re in, now and in future. To apply your choices to all folders, press Use as Defaults at the bottom of that window.

Combo Curative
~MacFormat
If you’re left with strange issues after an OS X update that can’t be fixed by other means, such as changing preferences, download that version’s Combo updater from Apple’s support site and install it over your current installation: you may find your problems suddenly vanish. This can also restore normal function to a Mac App Store app that refuses to offer updates. It’s not a universal cure, but worth trying when other ideas fail.

How to Back Up Your iPhone to iTunes on Your Computer
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
There are two ways to back up your iPhone. You can back up your iPhone to iCloud or back up your iPhone to iTunes. I like to have copies of both. An iCloud backup is kept in the cloud, while an iTunes backup is kept on your computer. You don’t need an internet connection to back up your iPhone to iTunes. Apple recommends having both an iCloud and a local backup. Here’s how to back up your iPhone to iTunes on your computer.

To back up your iPhone or iPad to iTunes on your computer, you first need to have the iTunes software installed. It comes installed on Mac computers, and Windows users can download iTunes here.

To back up your device to iTunes:
- Connect your iPhone to your computer using the USB charging cord. iTunes will launch automatically; if it doesn’t, open iTunes.
- In iTunes, locate the icon for your iPhone or iPad, found in the upper left section of iTunes. Click the icon.

How to Easily Unsubscribe from Email Lists in iOS 10
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
iOS 10 introduced a lot of smaller tweaks and features that make a big difference. One of my favorites is the one-step email list unsubscribe. This is especially useful if you signed up for something only to receive loads of spam emails with no obvious unsubscribe button at the bottom. This happened to me recently when signing up for a contest. I realized after the fact that I had also signed up to receive loads of emails from

all different kinds of websites promoting something. Inbox overwhelm set in. But then I saw that beautiful unsubscribe box at the top of the page. Thank you, iOS 10. Here’s how to easily unsubscribe from email lists in Mail with iOS 10 or later.

This solution for unsubscribing to email lists could not be any easier. Here’s how to do it: – Open the Mail app on iPhone or iPad.
- Open the email from the website or company you no longer want to receive emails from.
- At the top of the email, you’ll see blue text that says unsubscribe. Tap unsubscribe.
- Confirm Unsubscribe, and you’re free!

Fast Navigation in System Preferences on Mac
~MacFormat
While in a preferences pane, you don’t need to return to the full list to access another. Click and hold the toolbar’s grid button for a list of all panes, or go to the View menu (any item in which can be given a shortcut in Keyboard preferences), or press ccommand+F and type in the search field. When you’re at the top level of the app, the last method highlights relevant panes as you type.

Spring Open a Folder in Finder on a Mac
~MacFormat
When you drag items over a folder (or another tab or window in Finder), it springs open. If the delay in doing so is too long, press the Spacebar to instantly open the folder. The delay is adjustable in System Preferences > Accessibility > Mouse & Trackpad.

Mary’s X Files, September 2016

Saving power with Face-down detection for iPhone
~iLounge Tips
If you get a lot of notifications during the day, you can actually save a bit of battery life by leaving your iPhone face down on a table or other surface. Face-down detection is a subtle feature that Apple snuck into iOS 9 last fall to save a bit of power on modern iPhones by not lighting up the screen whenever text message notifications come in — after all, the screen is one of the biggest power consumers on the iPhone, and since you can’t see the screen anyway when the iPhone is face down, what’s the point in turning it on?

To enable the feature, simply place your iPhone face down on a table when you’re not using it — notifications will still sound or vibrate, according to your settings, but the screen will remain dark unless you pick up the iPhone within a few seconds of receiving the notification. Since the feature uses the M7/M8/M9 motion coprocessors, you’ll need an iPhone 5s or later to take advantage of it, and you’ll need to make sure you haven’t disabled Fitness Tracking under Privacy, Motion & Fitness in the iOS Settings app.

Shake to undo on iPhone
~Macworld
This one can be a little awkward at times but it can be a bit of a life saver. If you’ve just typed a long sentence and accidentally deleted it, or made some other catastrophic error, you can give your iPhone a shake to bring up the undo/redo dialogue box. Just make sure you’re holding on to your iPhone tightly before you shake it!

Since implementing this feature Apple has added an undo button to the system keyboard, thankfully, but this only appears when the iPhone is in landscape mode. If you can’t be bothered to type like that, get shaking.

Mute Noisy Conversations in Messages on Mac
~MacFormat
If a conversation in Messages distracts you with a swarm of notifications at the corner of the desktop, rather than turning on the Do Not Disturb feature of Notification Centre, which mutes all notifications, open the conversation, click Details at its top-right corner, and put a check mark next to Do Not Disturb here to mute only this conversation.

Startup Key Combinations for El Capitan
~MacFormat
The most commonly useful startup key combos are: “Shift Key” to enter Safe Mode; “Option Key” to select an alternative startup disk; “D” to start a hardware diagnostics test, if available, or hold “Option Key” as well to start it over the internet; “Command Key”+r to enter OS X Recovery, or hold “Option Key” too for the online version; “Command+Option+p+r” to reset NVRAM (see bit.ly/ mf-nvram); “Command+s” or “Command+v” for single-user or verbose mode (bit.ly/mfsuverb); and “t” for target disk mode.

“Gatekeeper” Security on Mac in System Preferences
~MacFormat
This feature restricts what apps can run according to their source, to reduce the likelihood of installing malware. It offers three options in the Security & Privacy pane, under General: “Anywhere” gives total freedom, essentially turning off Gatekeeper; “Mac App Store only” lets apps from there run; and the middle item also allows apps from other places that are signed by identified developers.

Silent Updates on Mac
~MacFormat
Yosemite and El Capitan now undergo silent updates to security files, which may have odd effects. An update to the XProtect security blacklist, say, might disable an old version of Flash or Java. Updates which affect SIP can disable hardware such as network ports when your Mac is next started up. If you think a silent update has altered your Mac, check /Library/Receipts/InstallHistory. plist to see what has occurred.

Speedy Access to System Preferences on Mac
~MacFormat
Rather than clicking a pane’s icon in System Preferences, try opening the pane using Spotlight. Type the first few characters of a pane’s name and it’ll likely be the top result. Alternatively, if you keep System Preferences in the Dock, you can control+click its icon there and then select the pane you want it to show immediately upon opening from an alphabetically ordered list.

Mary’s X Files, August 2016

How to access drafts in the Mail app for iPhone and iPad
~iMore
- Launch the Mail app from the Home screen of your iPhone or iPad.

- Tap and hold the Compose button in the lower right corner. This will bring up the drafted emails. – Tap on the email draft you’d like to edit.

You can fire away the email as soon as you’re done. That’s all there is to it.

Time a Reminder in El Capitan
~MacFormat
Place the pointer over a to-do you’ve created in Reminders and click the ‘i’ that appears to the right. In the box that pops up, put a check mark next to ‘On a Day’, then click the date for a mini-calendar. Simply choose the date to be alerted about the item, or choose ‘At a Location’ and then type an address or place name to be reminded when you’re there – or set both!

Sign Documents in Mail in El Capitan
~MacFormat
First, you must have an image displayed in a new mail window. Next, when you roll your cursor over the image, a small downward pointing arrow will appear. Click on that arrow and then click on “Markup”. Click the Sign button in the Markup toolbar and you’ll be asked if you want to write your signature by hand, using your trackpad. The tool can also use your Mac’s camera to take a photo of your signature on paper.

How to Add Emoticons to Text Messages in iOS
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
Emoticons are the little icons created from punctuation and symbol keys and are inserted into text to indicate your mood or intention. Most desktop computer programs automatically convert symbols to graphical emoticons. For example, if you type in :-) most programs will automatically convert it to a smily face. iPhone keyboards automatically have a stock of emoticons, but you can also download free emoji apps from the App Store.

First, make sure your Emoji keyboard is enabled. Open Settings. Tap General. Select Keyboard. Tap Keyboards.
If Emoji isn’t already on the list, tap it.

To add emoticons to your text messages, open Messages. Either start a new message or open a current one. Tap the text field. Tap on the globe icon on the lower left of the screen. Tap on the different menus along the bottom of the screen for lots of emoticon choices. Tap on the emoticon of your choice to insert it into the text field. Tap Send.

Use Mail Drop to Send Large Files in El Capitan
~MacFormat
Mail Drop lets you send large attachments between 20MB and 5GB in size, even if the recipient’s server would normally reject them. In Mail’s preferences, click Accounts, select an account, click Advanced to the right, and turn on ‘Send large attachments with Mail Drop’. Recipients not using Mail will see the attachment as a download link.

Test Time Machine Backup
~MacFormat
Never just assume that Time Machine backups are working okay. Every few weeks, enter Time Machine, browse through your backups and restore an old document and folder to check. Ensure you don’t overwrite any current work in the process.

How to Unfollow Facebook Friends
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
In the world of Facebook, unfriending someone is a big deal. And if you actually know the person, they’ll likely figure out you’ve unfriended them at some point and want to know why. Perhaps it’s not that serious and you would like to stay friends, but you don’t want to see what they post. Luckily, Facebook has the option to unfollow someone while remaining friends. Here’s how to do it.

There are two different ways to unfollow someone. Open the Facebook app. Locate a post by the person you want to unfollow. Tap the arrow next to their name.

Select Unfollow [Name]. You’ll immediately stop seeing posts by that person but continue to be friends. You can also unfollow someone by visiting their profile.

Search for the person you want to unfollow and visit their profile. Locate the Following icon. Tap it. Here you can choose Default, See First, or Unfollow. Select Unfollow.

Mary’s X Files, July 2016

Return to Owner
~MacFormat
Even if you have no need for any other iCloud services, it’s worth setting up an account just to use “Find My Mac”, which lets you track your Mac when it’s online using Wi-Fi, and play a sound, lock or erase the Mac when online over Wi-Fi or Ethernet. Also consider putting your contact details on the login window in System Preferences > Security & Privacy > General > Set Lock Message.

Eject a Stuck Disc on a Mac
~MacFormat
If your Mac has an optical drive and you can’t get Finder to eject a disc from it, there are a couple of workarounds. With a USB-connected optical drive, disconnect and then reconnect it, which should reset the connection and allow Finder to eject the disc. Otherwise, restart your Mac and hold the “eject” key, the “F12” key or the mouse or trackpad button when you hear the startup sound to eject the disc.

How to See When a Text Was Sent
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
Timestamps used to appear at the top of each text message on your iPhone. However, the old timestamps haven’t disappeared; they’re just hidden now. This is nice since you don’t always need to read the timestamp; and for those occasions when you do need to know when a message was received, here’s how to uncover the hidden timestamps behind each message.

To do this, you’ll have the Messages app open to a particular message. To see the timestamp, simply tap and hold any text message, then drag it to the left from the edge of the screen. Like a shy kitten, the timestamp will slowly peek in from the side.

When you let go, the timestamp will retreat into its hiding spot once again. That’s all there is to it!

Work smarter in Finder on the Mac
~MacFormat
Check a folder’s location Turning on the path bar (View > Show Path Bar) shows the current folder’s location across the bottom of its window. Double-click a folder in the bar to jump to it, command-click to open it in a new window, or drag and drop items onto one to move them there.

Show Full address in Safari on Mac
~MacFormat
Presumably in an attempt to be minimal and tidy, Safari no longer by default displays a web page’s full address in the Smart Search Field. Click around apple.com, say, and the field’s contents will stay unchanged throughout your visit. If that’s unnerving or annoying, tick ‘Show full website address’ in Safari’s Advanced preferences. The field then shows addresses in full. (Even with this setting off, the full address is shown when you click in the field.)

How to Merge Duplicate Contacts
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
It’s inevitable that you will occasionally find yourself with duplicate entries for the same contact. Fortunately, merging the information into a single entry is relatively simple. Here’s how to merge duplicate contacts.

Open your Phone app and tap “Contacts” at the bottom of the screen. Locate the duplicate contact and tap “Edit” in the upper right corner. Scroll down to the very bottom and select “Link Contacts”.
Your contacts will pop up; locate the duplicate you want to merge into a single contact and open it. Tap “Link” in the upper right corner.
If you have more duplicate entries, select “Link Contacts” and repeat.

Tap “Done” once you have linked all duplicate contacts.

To unlink contacts, simply tap the red minus sign next to the contact you wish to unlink.

Manage downloads in Safari on Mac
~MacFormat
In Safari’s General preferences, you can choose where file downloads are sent. If you don’t want them to go to your Downloads folder, select “Other” in the pop-up menu. Should you want Safari to ask where to save each one, you can specify that. There’s also a checkbox regarding opening safe files. Clear it if you don’t want your Mac to open docs, distracting you from what you’re doing.

Mary’s X Files, June 2016

How to remove recent contacts in the Mail app for iPhone & iPad
~iMore
When sending an email, the Mail app uses autofill to suggest a contact based on the name you enter. Sometimes, outdated email addresses show up in the suggestion list, even though you’ve updated the person’s information in your Contacts app. There is a way to remove email addresses from these autofill suggestions so you don’t accidentally send something to an unused mail box. Here’s how.

If you have removed an email address from your Contacts app, but it still appears when you are sending a message, get it off the list before you accidentally use it.

- Open the Mail app.
- Tap the Write mail icon in the bottom right corner of the screen.
- Start typing a name.
- Find the old contact when the list of suggested emails appear.
- Tap the info icon next to the name.
- Tap Remove from Recents.
The contact will no longer appear as a suggested email in autofill in the Mail app.

How to Recover Deleted Photos on iOS
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
If you like to use the camera on your iPhone or iPad, one of the features you’ll appreciate is the ability to recover deleted photos. When you delete a photo, it remains available in the Recently Deleted album on your device for 30 days. If you decide that in fact you want to save a photo you deleted, you can easily recover it. Here’s how to recover deleted photos.

- Navigate to the Albums view in the Photos app. In addition to any albums you’ve added, you’ll see the default album, Recently Deleted.

- Tap on the Recently Deleted album to view the photos you’ve deleted.

- Tap Select to choose the photos you want to recover.

Reset User Password on Mac
~MacFormat
If you can’t get past the login window because you’ve forgotten your account password, you can reset it by starting up in OS X Recovery by holding command+r when you hear the startup sound. Choose Utilities > Terminal, then enter resetpassword, select the account to reset and provide a new password. (Note that this won’t change FileVault’s password If you’ve encrypted your disk.)

Mission Control Closer Look
~MacFormat
In El Capitan, Apple has switched Mission Control’s presentation to spread out all of your windows instead of stacking them up. If you have many windows open in the same workspace, their previews in Mission Control can get pretty small. To take a closer look at one, put the pointer over it and then press the Spacebar to pull it forward of the others.

Switch Audio Devices on a Mac
~MacFormat
Your Mac remembers volume levels for speakers and headphones individually, and makes adjustments as you connect or disconnect them. However, you may not want to unplug your headphones just to demo something to another person. Rather than opening the Sound preferences pane, hold down the option key and click the volume icon in the menu bar to switch to a different input or output device. If that icon isn’t present, turn on ‘Show volume in menu bar’ at the bottom of the Sound preferences’ pane.

Keyboard Shortcuts on the Mac
~MacFormat
If a menu item you use often doesn’t list a keyboard shortcut, you can assign it one in System Preferences > Keyboard > Shortcuts > App Shortcuts. Click the + button, select the app in which the item appears, then enter the item’s name exactly as it appears, right down to capitalisation and any ellipsis at its end. Click in the bottom box, then press the key combo you want to trigger the item.

A Hidden Gesture on the Mac
~MacFormat
If your Mac has a trackpad, there’s an extra gesture for it tucked away in the Accessibility preferences pane, under Mouse & Trackpad > Trackpad Options. Put a check mark next to ‘Enable dragging’ and select three-finger drag from the adjacent pop-up menu. This

gesture may feel more comfortable for you than clicking and dragging things due to its relative lack of friction.

Mary’s X Files, May 2016

Why does Apple’s App Store use ‘Get’ for free apps?
~Macworld
Paul A. writes in with an App Store question: “I am a little confused by the terms used by the App Store when deciding to download and buy an app. What is the difference between “open” and “get”?”

Apple used to tag apps that cost nothing to download as “Free”, while it displayed the price for all others. However, it changed this label from “Free” to “Get” in November 2014, possibly as a result of settlements in 2013 and 2014 related to in-app purchases. Free-to-download apps can have in-app purchases, which muddied the water, although Apple puts a plus sign inside the Get button’s border if the app has such purchases. “Get” isn’t the best term—Paul isn’t the only one who scratched his head about it—but it’s more accurate than “free.”

Tap “Get” and the label changes to “Install”; tap that, and the app is marked in your account as something you purchased, despite not paying a cent to download it. Tap the price on a paid app, and it changes to “Buy”; tap that, and the transaction completes (often with the added necessity of entering your account password) and it’s also now in your account as a purchase.

You’ll see a cloud icon with a downward-pointing arrow if you’ve purchased or downloaded the app already and it’s not installed on the device you’re using; if it’s installed, the label reads “Open”, and tapping it simply opens the app on your device.

How to share your location and directions in Maps for iPhone and iPad
~iMore
- Launch the Maps app from your Home screen.
- Tap the arrow in the bottom left corner of your screen. This will take you to your location on the map, marked by a pulsating blue dot. – Tap the Share button on the top right of the screen. It’s a box with an upward arrow.
- Tap the method you’d like to use to share your location.
- Share as you would normally in your chosen method.

You can easily share your location via group chat or into a Facebook event if you fancy.

How to Quickly Scroll to the Top of Your iPhone Screen While Sparing Your Thumb
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
Maybe you have thousands of songs stored on your phone or hundreds of emails in your inbox, maybe you just read a really long article online, or maybe you’re really important and popular and you have an endless list of contacts. Your thumb can sure get a workout scrolling back to the top of those lists. But did you know there’s an easy way to quickly scroll back the top of any page? There is! Here’s how to scroll to the top quickly while sparing your thumb.

The solution couldn’t be easier. To end the infinite thumbing your way to the top of the page, all you need to is tap the clock at the top, and you’ll be instantly taken back to the beginning of the list. This works on nearly any page where you’ve scrolled down whether it be email, a page in Safari, music, etc.

How to Redial a Phone Number on your iPhone
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
When you need to redial a number or call the person you previously talked to, there’s a really fast shortcut you can make from the Phone app. Instead of going to your Recents or searching through your contacts, if you’re calling the previous person you spoke to, you can do it with two quick taps.

To do this, open the Phone app. Tap on Keypad at the bottom of the menu. Tap the green call button and the previous number with contact name will fill-in at the top. Tap the green call button again to make the call.

Reset Spotlight after Repositioning in El Capitan
~Mac|LIfe
After doing a Spotlight search, reposition the window to the size and location you desire. After you have repositioned it, the box will appear in the same place the next time you press çommand+[Spacebar]. To reset the window’s size and position to its default settings, click and hold on Spotlight’s icon in the menu bar.

Edit a Photo in Preview in OSX
~iCreate
Double-clicking on the photo will automatically load it in the Preview app on a Mac by default. Select “View>Show Markup Toolbar” and you’re given a range of options, from rotating to complex saturation edits.

Import with Image Capture on Mac
~iCreate
You don’t need to load up the Photos app every time you want to do some image editing on your Mac. Connect whatever device your images are on and open the Image Capture app. Drag a picture to your desktop and choose whatever image editing application you desire to edit the image.

Mary’s X Files, April 2016

Use Emoji Shortcuts Instead of Switching Keyboards in iOS
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
Previously, we covered creating keyboard shortcuts to help you quickly type commonly used phrases. Did you know you can also create shortcuts for emoji characters (those cute emoticons that go way beyond your average smiley face)? This is handy if you use a lot of emoji characters and don’t want to switch back and forth between keyboards all the time.

Before you can do this, you’ll have to enable the emoji keyboard if you haven’t already: Go to Settings > General > Keyboards > Add New Keyboard > Emoji.

After you’ve enabled the emoji keyboard, go back to Keyboard and tap Shortcuts. Tap on the + in the upper right corner to create a new shortcut.

Next, tap on the smiley face or globe icon in the lower left between the number and mic icons.

This will take you to the emoji keyboard. In the Phrase field enter the emoji you are creating a shortcut for. Tap the ABC icon to switch back to the English keyboard and then enter a word in the Shortcut field and tap Save in the upper right corner.

Now every time you type this word the emoji character will automatically be substituted.

Shortcuts when Editing in Photos on Mac
~Macworld
Shortcuts in Photos also go directly to specific tools, even if you’re not yet in the editing view. Press C to open the Crop tool, F for filters, A for the Adjust tool, R for the Retouch tool, and E for the Red-eye tool. While you’re editing, press the arrow keys to switch to the previous or next photo without leaving the editing view.

To compare your edits to the original version of the photo, press the M key for a quick before-and- after.

How to Turn Off Government Alerts in iOS
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
There have been a couple of times now that I’ve been startled out of a deep sleep by my iPhone emitting a high pitched screeching sound. The sound was to make me aware of an AMBER (child abduction) Alert.

I think AMBER Alerts are a great thing and help save lives, but what annoyed me was that the alert

was from a city almost 300 miles away from me. Was it really relevant to me?

Most of the time the alerts are pinged off of cell towers and are specific to the area. I’m not sure why I received this particular alert, but it made me consider turning it off.

This is quite easy to do. Just go to Settings > Notifications > then scroll all the way down to the bottom and toggle AMBER Alerts Off. If you don’t see any Government Alerts options, this means your carrier does not offer this service and this tip does not apply to you.

Speed up startup times on Mac
~iCreate
If you are the only user of the Mac you can skip the login screen and go straight to the desktop.

To do this, simply go to your machine’s System Preferences>Users & Groups and then click “Login Options”. Click the padlock in the bottom-left corner and enter your password. Select your name next to Automatic Login.

A word of warning – this removes password security and should not be used on a Mac that other people, however infrequently, can access. It is super fast, but anyone can turn on your Mac and see your files, so use with caution.

Boost Wi-Fi network speeds on Mac
~iCreate
Wireless routers broadcast on what are called channels, and if two, such as you and a neighbour, use the same

channel, then performance suffers. Use Spotlight to find and run Wireless Diagnostics. Click Scan on the Windows menu and all networks and channels are listed. If yours clashes with a neighbour’s, enter your router’s IP address into Safari (eg 192.168.2.1) and you can select another channel in the settings.

Shut down option on Mac
~iCreate
When you shut down, there is an option to Reopen windows when logging back in. Clear the tick box to prevent OS X wasting time opening the apps and windows you used last

Mary’s X Files, March 2016

Import from Camera to OSX App, Preview
~TidBITS
**Import from Cameras** — Here’s something you probably didn’t know:

Preview can import images directly from cameras and scanners. Better yet, in Preview’s eyes, your iPhone or iPad counts as a camera.

To import pictures from a camera, connect it to your Mac via a USB cable, open Preview, and choose Import from _CameraName_ (for instance, Import from iPhone).

A window appears displaying thumbnails of the photos on that camera, largely mirroring the look and features of Apple’s Image Capture utility (which lives in the Utilities folder inside your Applications folder). By default, Preview displays the photos in a list, with EXIF information like the date and time the picture was taken, file size, resolution, GPS coordinates, aperture size, whether the flash was fired, and more. Even if you don’t want to use Preview to import your photos, it’s a handy way to view all that data.

Neat Trick via OSX App, Preview
~TidBITS
Here’s another neat trick: if you select a file in the Finder, choose Edit > Copy (or press Command-C), and then invoke Preview’s “New from Clipboard” command. It creates a new document containing all sizes and resolutions of that file’s icon. It’s a great way to snag

an application or document icon!

Archive your Contacts
~iCreate

  1. Load up Contact — Open your Contacts app on your Mac by clicking its icon in the Dock or heading to your Applications folder and searching for it.
  2. Export menu — Now go up to File in the menubar and scroll down to the Export menu. From the options that slide out right, select Contact Achieve to continue.
  3. Safe place — All that’s left to do is save your Contacts archive to a safe destination. Hit “Save” when ready. your contact information is now safely backed up.

Share Huge files over Email
~iCreate
Fed up of using WeTransfer or Dropbox to transfer large file sizes over email? We were too, until we started using iCloud’s brilliant Mail Drop feature. As long as you have the ‘Send large attachments with Mail Drop’ setting ticked in the Advanced section of Mail>Preferences>Accounts, you can send files up to 5GB in size over email. The recipient will be sent a link to access the contents, which stays active for 30 days.

Using iCloud Drive
~iCreate
If you’re reading this and you haven’t set up iCloud yet, don’t worry — you’re not alone. Plenty of Apple users have resisted ‘the cloud’ for many reasons. We firmly believe that the positives far outweigh the negatives. Thankfully, Apple makes setting up an iCloud account simple. All you need is an Apple ID and the following instructions…

- Set up on Mac — Go to system Preferences and select iCloud. Activating iCloud is now as simple as entering your Apple ID and enabling which features you want synced.
- Set up on iOS — On your iOS device, head to your Settings menu and tap iCloud. Type in your apple ID credentials, tap Sign In and choose what you want to sync to iCloud.

How to Answer a Call with a Text Message
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
Sometimes, you just don’t have time to answer the phone. Especially if you’re driving, it’s often safer to send an iPhone automated message to let the person know you’ll call them back later. This function is accessible right from the call screen with different messages prepared for quick sending. Here’s how to answer a call with a text message if you happen to be busy.

When your phone is ringing, tap Message over Slide to Answer.

You will get a menu of responses and a Custom option. Tap “Can I call you later?”, “Sorry, I can’t talk right now.” or “I’m on my way.” Your phone will automatically send a text for you.

If you tap the Custom option, a text conversation with that person will appear. Type whatever you like! (But please don’t choose this option if you’re driving!). Tap Send, and you’re done.