Mary’s X Files, December 2017

Green Button Action in Current MacOS’s
~MacLife
Clicking on the green button in the top-left corner of any window will now make it full-screen, but holding Alt/Opt and clicking it will bring back the old maximize option.

Shared iCloud Storage in MacOS High Sierra
~iCreate
Got cloud storage to spare? Then share it with your family. As many of us will have discovered, the free 5GB iCloud space allocation doesn’t go very far, but if you pay extra for additional space then you may find that you hardly make a dent in it. However, in the High Sierra update you can put spare iCloud space to good use by sharing it with family members. Here’s how.

1. Manage Family — Provided you have already set up Family Sharing on your Mac, go to System Preferences>iCloud and then click on the ‘Manage Family’ option underneath your profile picture.

2. Apps and services — You can add family members by clicking the ‘+’ icon in the left column, but for now, click on ‘My Apps & Services’ at the top and you will see sections including ‘Purchase Sharing’, ‘Apple Music’ and ‘iCloud Storage’.

3. State sharing — Click on the ‘iCloud Storage’ option and you will see the option to ‘Start Sharing’. Click on this and all of your connected family members will be able to share your iCloud storage plan.

How to share contacts with iMessage on iPhone or iPad
~iMore
Sharing contact information with friends has never been easier than with iMessage.

Launch the Contacts app. On the iPhone you can alternately use the Phone app if you’d prefer. Find and tap the Contact you’d like to share. Now tap on Share Contact towards the bottom.

Tap on Messages.Type the name of the person you’d like to share it with and select them. Now tap Send.

You’ve successfully sent a contact with iMessage! Way more efficient than copying and pasting a phone number, eh?

How to share Location with iMessage on iPhone or iPad
~iMore
If a friend or family member is coming to meet you, you might want to send your current location so they can quickly and easily get to exactly where you are.

Launch the Messages app. Tap on the conversation in which you’d like to send your location. Tap on the Information button in the upper right hand corner. Tap on Send My Current Location.

The person on the other end will be able to see where you are and even tap to get directions.

How to create a Reminder in a specific List with Siri
~iMore
If you have multiple lists in Reminders, like a packing list, a party list, etc. you can tell Siri to create a to-do item specifically for one of those lists.

1. Say “Hey, Siri” or press and hold down the Home button to activate Siri.

2. Say aloud what you want to be reminded about and in which List you want it to go. For example: “Add milk to grocery shopping list.”

3. Tap Remove to cancel the Reminder.

The Reminder will then be placed in the List you specified.

How to create a time-based reminder with Siri
~iMore
One of the easiest things to do with Siri is have it set up a quick Reminder. Siri is so quick, in fact, it’s almost always faster to use Siri than to tap your way through the Reminders app.

1. Say “Hey, Siri”" or press and hold down the Home button to activate Siri.

2. Say aloud what you want to be reminded about, and when. For example: “Remind me to call Leanna at 9pm.”

3. Tap Remove to cancel the reminder.

The Reminder will go into the default Reminders list. This will be “Reminders” or whichever list you set as the default list in Settings.

Mary’s X Files, November 2017

How to save an email as a PDF on iPhone and iPad
~iMore
You can save an email as a PDF without 3D Touch. It’s just as easy and you can use it with iPhone and iPad!

If your iPhone has 3D Touch, you may already know that you can save an email as a PDF file using 3D Touch in the built-in Mail app. It’s really nice when you’ve got an email you want to save outside of your Mail app. You know, in case something happens to the email like it gets lost in your messy, messy inbox.

But what if your iPhone doesn’t have 3D Touch, or want to save an email as a PDF on your iPad? You can’t just firmly press on the email and have it magically turn into a PDF. You can, however, magically turn it into a PDF with a slightly different gesture. It’s both non-obvious and easy to so do. Here’s how.

Open the Mail app on your iPhone or iPadTap an email message that you want to save as a PDF. Tap the action button. The action button looks like a reply arrow (it’s also used to reply to or forward email messages). Tap Print to open the printer options.

Pinch open the thumbnail image of the first page of your email. If your email runs for more than a page, you can pinch open any of the pages. The Printer Options will be replaced with the PDF version of your email message. Tap the Share button in the upper right corner of the screen. Select the app you want to save or share your PDF-converted email to.

Thanks to the in-app sharing feature in the Mail app, you can do a number of things with your new PDF. You can send it to a nearby person using DropBox, save it to your Notes app, copy it to iBooks, and more. A lot of third-party apps support sharing and storing of PDF emails, too, like DropBox, Messenger, and Slack. The world is your oyster. Now go out there and turn some emails into PDFs.

Switch Apps using the Keyboard in iOS 11
~Cult of Mac
The app switcher single-handedly turns the iPad into a Mac replacement.

The iPad uses the same Command-Tab app switcher as the Mac. That is, hitting the tab key together with the Command key on a connected keyboard will bring up the app-switcher strip across the center of the screen.

It look a lot like the Dock, but it is, in fact, an icon-based list of your most recently-used apps, in order of most recent use. Keep the Command key held down while you tap Tab, and you will cycle through the list. Let go to launch the app.

You can also hit the tilde key to reverse the switcher’s direction, or even use the left and right arrow keys once the app switcher is up on screen (you still need to keep the Command key held down). You can even touch one of the icons to launch the app.

Siri Sets the System
~MacLife
Siri in macOS Sierra can do plenty of cool tricks, but undoubtedly the most useful is its ability to control common system settings.

You can ask Siri to turn down your display’s brightness, increase the volume and perform a number of other similar tasks.
It’s bound to save you a few click and will save you from switching tasks if you’re right in the middle of working on something important.

Create Text Shortcuts in macOS
~MacLife
When you’re in System PreferencesShow , if you go to the Keyboard pane and then click on the Text tab, you will be able to create your own text shortcuts. This means that if you regularly type the same words or phrases, you could save yourself a great deal of time by setting up a shortcut.

Simply click on the ’+’ icon to add a new shortcut, then type in the chosen shortcut (a much shorter version of what you intend to type) followed by the actual text you want to type. This is also a useful feature for saving time filling in application forms that require you name, title and address.

Show the Status Bar in macOS
~MacLife
While in Finder, select ‘View’ from the menu at the top and then click ‘Show Status Bar’. This will pop up a small bar at the bottom of the Finder window which details important information such as the number of files in the current folder and the amount of free memory available to you.

It’s a very simple feature, but one that you will likely glance at whenever you use Finder, because it can highlight potential memory problems. A handy shortcut for selecting this feature is to press “Command’ and the backslash ‘/’ button.

Mary’s X Files, October 2017

Send Items to Trash Instantly on Mac OS
~iCreate
When moving files to the Trash we always manually drag and drop the items. Why? Because we didn’t know that if you simply highlight the files and then press Cmd + Delete, then they will be instantly warped to the rubbish bin.

Make use of the flashlight in iOS 11
~iCreate
Whether you’re walking home alone at night, trying to find your tent at a festival or you need to use your device as an emergency beacon, your iPhone’s built-in flashlight can be a huge help.

To activate it, swipe up to access your Control Center on iOS 11 and then tap the flashlight icon. If you have an iPhone 6S or higher you can also press down on this icon to determine the brightness of the light.

Configure your Mouse in macOS
~MacLife
Ensure that your mouse works in exactly the way you want it to.

To control your Mac, you will either use a trackpad or a mouse. However, everyone likes their mouse to perform differently with varying tracking speeds, scrolling speeds and more. The “Mouse” pane in System Preferences allows you to not only personalize how your mouse performs, but also assign key tasks to the buttons. For example, you can use the secondary button to bring up Mission Control, Spotlight or your Dashboard. You can also set up a Bluetooth mouse here.

Show the Status Bar in Finder on macOS
~MacLife
While in Finder, select ‘View’ from the menu at the top and then click ‘Show Status Bar’. This will pop up a small bar at the bottom of all Finder windows, which details important information, such as the number of files in the current folder and the amount of free storage available to you.

It’s a very simple feature, but one that you will likely glance at whenever you use Finder, because it can highlight potential storage problems. A handy shortcut for selecting this feature is to press ‘Command’ and the backslash ‘/’ button.

Make FaceTime calls anywhere in macOS
~MacLife
You don’t actually need to be in the FaceTime app to activate video calls, thanks to the seamless integration with the rest of macOS. All you need to look for is a little video camcorder icon in various apps and click on it to spring a FaceTime call into life. A prime example would be from within the Contacts app. If a contact has a compatible device, the camcorder icon will be present and you can call them at any time. Likewise, an entry in Maps or Safari will show if a business or company can be contacted via FaceTime. This is a very handy feature.

Give Siri a hand
~MacLife
With a little bit of help, Siri can be a very useful personal assistant. Two fields in Contact cards worth spending some time with are Nickname and Related Name. if you add entries into these fields, you’ll be able to use Siri more effectively. For example, add nicknames like ‘dentist’ or ‘doctor’ and you can use Siri to say “Hey Siri, call my dentist.” It’s worth doing this now that the digital assistant has made an entrance in macOS Sierra. This would be very useful as it could potentially speed up and manage your workflow and busy schedule.

Create Quick Events in Calendar
~MacLife
While there are plenty of ways to create a new event in Calendar, the quickest and most natural is to simply click the + button in the top toolbar. You’ll see a text box appear, where you can simply type, in natural language, the name, time and date of the event you want to create. Calendar will translate what you’ve typed and add an event to the calendar instantly. You’ll also get suggestions for similar events, so you can repeat them if needed without having to type it all in again.

Mary’s X Files, September 2017

Record your iOS Device with your Mac
~iCreate
Your Mac’s QuickTime Player app is a versatile beast with the ability to record your Mac’s screen, or the screen of any connected device, such as your iPhone or iPad. Here’s how to set it up…

Step 1 – New Recording
In the QuickTime Player app, go to File>New Movie Recording and a blank recording window will appear on your desktop. Now, move your cursor over it to display a small control window.

Step 2 – Choose Device
While the control window is displayed, click on the arrow icon next to the red Record button and then choose your device from the list of options. The screen of your connected device will now appear.

Step 3 – Start Recording
Now simply click on the red Record button and whatever you do on your connected device will be recorded on your Mac. This is particularly useful for taking screenshots of fast-moving games.

Decide What Loads at Startup on MacOS
~iCreate
You have full freedom to decide which apps and services automatically load when you start up your Mac. Some apps even take the liberty to add themselves to your startup list when they are installed and used.

You can add and remove things from the startup list at any time by going to System Preferences>Users & Groups and then clicking on ‘Login items’. Here, you will be able to check and uncheck items as required.

Faster Charging in iOS
~iCreate
If you need to charge your iPhone but only have a limited amount of time in which to do so then it is worth remembering that your device will charge much faster in Airplane mode. Swipe up to a access the Control Center and then you can enable it from there.

Get Instant Spotlight Access in MacOS
~iCreate
Instead of moving your mouse to the top-right corner of your display and clicking on the magnifying glass icon, you can speed things up by hitting Cmd+Space to instantly open a new Spotlight window in which to start typing keywords.

How to Get Mail Notifications in iOS
~iCreate
When you are using the Mail app in iOS, if you are in the middle of an important email conversation, perhaps with multiple participants, then you can choose to get notified whenever anyone replies to the message thread. Enable this by tapping on the flag icon at the top of the window and then simply choosing the ‘Notify Me…’ option from the menu.

How to call it a quote in an email in iOS
~iMore
1. Launch the Mail app from your iPhone or iPad’s Home screen or app drawer.
2. Tap on the Compose button in the bottom right corner.
3. Fill out the sender info, subject, and body just as you would for a normal email.
4. Tap and hold the text you would like to use Quote Level with. A bubble will appear over the text you would want to select.
5. Tap select to highlight the text you would like to use Quote Level with.
6. Tap the arrow to the right of the menu to view more options once the text is highlighted.
7. Tap the arrow again.
8. Tap on Quote Level.
9. Tap on increase to expand the quote level, or decrease to shrink it.

Mary’s X Files, August 2017

How to Reset your Apple ID Password by Email
~MacLife
1. Apple maintains a dedicated website, iforgot.apple.com, to help with forgotten Apple ID Passwords. Go there in your web browser, enter the email address linked to your Apple ID and then click “Continue”.

2. Choose to reset it: choose “I need to reset my password” and click “Continue”. Next, you’ll be asked how you want to reset your password. If your Apple ID is linked to a working email address, choose “Get an Email”. Then, click “Continue”.

3. Pick a new password: in your inbox, find the email with the subject “How to reset your Apple ID password”. Click “Reset Now” in that email to go to the Apple ID website. Enter your new password twice in the corresponding fields. Then, click “Reset Password”.

iCloud Keychain
~MacLife
Once you’re singed in to iCloud in System Preferences on your Mac, you can set up iCloud Keychain. This stores an encrypted copy of website account details and bank cards that you enter in Safai to save you having to re-enter them.

If you don’t already use this feature and want to, follow the steps at bit.ly/ickeychain to set it up. During setup, you’ll be asked to create a six-digit security code, which you can enter on additional devices to grant them access to your keychain. (Note that with two-factor authentication enabled for your Apple ID, it takes the security code’s place in protecting your keychain.)

You’ll also be asked for a cell phone number to verify your identity by sending a verification code in a text message. To update your number or if you forget your code, click “Options” next to Keychain in iCloud’s prefs.

If you choose to reset the code, the keychain’s current contents are lost. to do so, chick “Keychain”. Then, click “Forgot Code”.

Quick Navigation: Jump to a Higher Folder on Mac
~MacLife
There are quick routes to get from the folder you’re viewing to higher levels of your Mac’s storage. Control-click a Finder window’s title to see a list of parent folders all the way up to the top of your Mac. Then, click one to jump to it.

Alternatively, choose “View>Show Path Bar”. This adds a bar across the bottom of Finder windows; double-click a folder to jump to it, or hold the Option key and double- click a folder to open it in a new tab. you can also drag items from the main view to a folder in the bar to move them.

How to view recently closed tabs in Safari on your iPhone or iPad
~iMore
Did you accidentally close a tab in Safari on your iPhone or iPad? Here’s how to get it back!

Whether you accidentally closed a tab you were viewing or are trying to remember something from an article you just read, you should know that getting back to a closed tab in Safari is pretty simple. With just a couple of taps, you can jump right back to where you were instead of having to dig through your history.

Here’s how!

How to view your recently closed tabs in Safari for iPhone
1. Launch Safari from your Home screen.
2. Tap the tab button (looks like two stacked squares).
3. Tap and hold on the new tab button (looks like a ‘+’).
4. Tap on one of your recently closed tabs if you want to open it again.

How to view your recently closed tabs in Safari for iPad
1. Open Safari on your Home screen.
2. Tap and hold on the new tab button (looks like a ‘+’).
3. Tap on one of your recently closed tabs if you want to open it again.

Mary’s X Files, July 2017

Use Siri to Change Settings
~iCreate
The addition of Siri to macOS can greatly speed up the time it takes to change certain basic settings of your Mac. Launch Siri and start asking for various System Preferences to be changed to save you the hassle of launching the main settings in the first place.

1. Activate Siri: Call up Siri on your Mac by pressing Cmd+Spacebar. You can change this shortcut by going to System Preferences>Siri.

2. Adjust the brightness: Now you can say things like, “Turnup the brightness” and Siri will automatically make your screen brighter. It’s a handy time saver.

3. Other functions: You can also say things like, “Turn onBluetooth” and Siri will oblige. Once you get into the habit of asking, Siri can save you a lot of time here and there.

Manage your iCloud storage
~iCreate
If you are sticking fast with the free 5GB of iCloud storage allocation for every user then it won’t take long to fill up with backups and documents. However, you can manually manage what is stored in your cloud and free up space, if needs be.

1. Go to Settings: Launch your iPad’s Settings app and then tap on General>Storage & iCloud Usage. This will give you an overview of the storage on your device and iCloud.

2. Manage storage: Now, in the iCloud section, tap on the ‘Manage Storage’ option and everything that eats into your iCloud storage will be listed, from backups to emails.

3. Delete data: You can now delete old backups thatyou don’t need and tap on individual apps that upload documents and data and manually remove content.

Back up iPhone
~MacFormat
There are two ways to back up your iPhone. You can back up your iPhone to iCloud or back up your iPhone to iTunes. I like to have copies of both. An iCloud backup is kept in the cloud, while an iTunes backup is kept on your computer. You don’t need an internet connection to back up your iPhone to iTunes. Apple recommends having both an iCloud and a local backup. Here’s how to back up your iPhone to iTunes on your computer.

To back up your iPhone or iPad to iTunes on your computer, you first need to have the iTunes software installed. It comes installed on Mac computers. To back up your device to iTunes:
- Connect your iPhone to your computer using the USB charging cord. iTunes will launch automatically; if it doesn’t, open iTunes.
- In iTunes, locate the icon for your iPhone or iPad, found in the upper left section of iTunes. Click the icon.

Delete digits in Calculator
~iCreate
It’s always good to have a calculator on hand, and your iPhone supplies the goods. However, the app lacks a button on the compact keyboard to delete numbers if you make a mistake. Is pressing ‘C’ the only option? No, as it happens…

1. Launch the app: You can launch the Calculator app on your iPhone by tapping the app icon on your home screen or swiping up and accessing it from the Control Center.

2. Enter numbers: Start typing numbers into Calculator and you should notice that there isn’t a button to delete digits, only the clear-all ‘C’ button. But it is possible…

3. Swipe left or right: That’s right, a good old swipe! Simply swipe left or right across the top of the screen and digits will be removed one at a time until there are none left. Easy.

Get rid of all your Notification Center alerts in iOS 10
~iMore
Trash five days’ worth of Instagram notifications by force pressing (or long pressing) on the X on your notifications screen to bring up an alert to clear all notifications.

Create Reminders in iOS 10
~MacFormat
While in an app, you can tell Siri to “Remind me about this” and it will create a reminder named after whatever you’re currently looking at in the app. You can also send things to Reminders from apps such as Safari by tapping the Share button, then Reminders. Here, you can add text and, by tapping the Options button, set a time or location to be reminded. In Safari’s case, when you access that reminder, it will take you straight to the linked web page.

Mary’s X Files, June 2017

How to check your iPhone’s battery percentage on your Mac
~iMore
Even if your iPhone is in the other room, you can see how much juice it has left with a neat little Option + Click trick.

9to5Mac’s Zac Hall discovered a neat little trick you can do on your Mac. You can check the battery life of your iPhone (and not just the battery indicator icon) right from the Menu bar. You don’t need a third-party app. Your iPhone doesn’t need to be connected to your computer. You just need to hold Option + Click from the Wi-Fi menu.

Normally, when you click the Wi-Fi icon in your Menu bar, you can turn Wi-Fi on or off, enable your personal hotspot from a supported iPhone or another cellular device, see all Wi-Fi networks nearby, and access more network preferences.

When you hold down the Option key while clicking the Wi-Fi icon in the Menu bar, you’ll get a little more detailed information, like your IP address and other internet data.

Under Personal Hotspot, you can see your iPhone, it’s cellular connection, and a battery indicator icon showing a rough estimate of your remaining juice. This has been available in the Wi-Fi menu for years.

If you hover over your iPhone in the Personal Hotspot section, however, a submenu will appear next to it, showing your device’s unique identifier number and the actual percent of your remaining battery power.

How to export images at full image resolution from macOS Photos
~Ask 911
The default export option in Photos hides that you might be reducing resolution.

In Photos, choosing File > Export > Export [x] Photo(s), the export option is collapsed by default, showing just Photo Kind. I don’t have a default installation, but when you click the downward-pointing area to expand the Photos section of that dialog box, the Size menu isn’t set to Full Size.

If you use the default options in collapsed or expanded view, you’re thus exporting a downsampled/lower resolution version of your original. Full Size incorporates any changes you made into a photo (or video), although it’s still doing some processing.

For media you’ve just imported into Photos and haven’t modified at all, choosing File > Export > Export Unmodified Original for [x] Photo(s) copies exactly what was imported into Photos.

How to Forward a Text Message on iPhone
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
Can text messages be forwarded? Why, yes, they can! If you’ve ever accidentally sent a message to the wrong person or wanted to pass a message you received from one person on to someone else, you can easily forward texts from the Messages app. When you forward a text message on iPhone, you can also add your own comments before sending it on. This is a great way to forward pictures you receive in messages that you want to share with friends. Here’s how to forward a text message on iPhone.

To forward a text:

Open the conversation in Messages containing the text you want to pass on.

Double tap or press and hold on the the body of the message.

Tap “More” and all the messages will shift to the right. Small circles will appear to the left of each text, with the message you’ve tapped on already selected. Tap on the circle next to any additional messages you want to forward.

How to call it a quote in an email in iOS
~iMore

  • Launch the Mail app from your iPhone or iPad’s Home screen or app drawer.
  • Tap on the Compose button in the bottom right corner.
  • Fill out the sender info, subject, and body just as you would for a normal email.
  • Tap and hold the text you would like to use Quote Level with. A bubble will appear over the text you would want to select.
  • Tap select to highlight the text you would like to use Quote Level with.
  • Tap the arrow to the right of the menu to view more options once the text is highlighted.
  • Tap the arrow again.
  • Tap on Quote Level.
  • Tap on increase to expand the quote level, or decrease to shrink it.

Mary’s X Files, May 2017

Adding Signatures
~iCreate
There are tools built in to the Mac OS system software that will let you add a personal touch to emails and documents. In some instances, the ability to add you real signature to a document or email can make all the difference in whether it is classed as acceptable or not, and all you need to do is capture it through you Mac’s camera.

To start, open a PDF file in the Preview app and then click the toolbox at the top. Now click the signature icon and then hold up your written signature on a piece of paper to your Mac’s camera. When you are happy with what you see, click to accept it and you can now position it anywhere in your PDF file.

Now, save it and you have a real signature that you can use in any other app. In Mail, for example, you can insert the image into your standard signature for use in every email you send.

Change Default Finder View
~iCreate
Finder is obviously the best solution for managing and making edits to all of the files on your Mac, but the temptation to just accept the way it works is great. You can, however, change the default Finder view for any folder that is in view using a very simple technique. Right-click on a folder and then click ‘Show View options’. If you want to default to a set view, make sure that it is active first and you will then be able to select ‘Always open in xxx view’.

The options to arrange an sort icons are also present so a little bit of time spent customizing the folder views to your needs will pay dividends in the future.

It is also worth remembering that you may want to use different views for different folders depending on the content they hold. For example, thumbnails makes sense for folders containing images and you can also right-click the view icons at the top to access more options that are otherwise hidden. In theory, Finder can work in any way you like and you have the ability to truly make it perfect for your needs.

How to Search Nearby Maps Locations from Widgets Screen in iOS 10
iPhone Life Tip of the Day
iOS 10 on iPhone added a fresh Widgets screen, available with a right swipe from Lock Screen or Home Screen. On this Widgets screen, you can choose what information is displayed. If you allow Maps Nearby to be active, you can easily search for nearby locations with Lunch, Coffee, Shopping, Gas, and more. Searching for nearby maps locations from the Widgets screen in iOS 10 jumps right to the information you need once you’ve unlocked your iPhone. Here’s how to search nearby locations from Widgets screen in iOS 10.

First, let’s make sure you’ve enable nearby locations with maps on the Widgets screen. To do this:

  • From Lock Screen, swipe right. This opens the Widgets screen.
  • Scroll to the very bottom and tap Edit.
  • Unlock your iPhone.
  • Now, you’re on the Add Widgets page. If you see Maps Nearby in the list near the top, it’s already enabled. If not, find Maps Nearby and tap the green circle to add it.

How to Search Nearby Maps Locations from Widgets Screen

Now that you’re all set up:

Open the Widgets screen.

  • Find the block named Maps Nearby. You’ll have four options that will vary depending on the time of day and your habits.
  • For example, I currently see Lunch, Coffee, Shopping, and Gas. Tap on the item you want to search for nearby locations in Maps.
  • If you’re phone is locked, unlock it.
  • Your iPhone will open with Maps open and searching for that item nearby.

How to call it a quote in an email in iOS
~iMore
1. Launch the Mail app from your iPhone or iPad’s Home screen or app drawer.

2. Tap on the Compose button in the bottom right corner.

3. Fill out the sender info, subject, and body just as you would for a normal email.

4. Tap and hold the text you would like to use Quote Level with. A bubble will appear over the text you would want to select.

5. Tap select to highlight the text you would like to use Quote Level with.

6. Tap the arrow to the right of the menu to view more options once the text is highlighted.

7. Tap the arrow again.

8. Tap on Quote Level.

9. Tap on increase to expand the quote level, or decrease to shrink it.

Mary’s X Files, April 2017

Speed up your Web Browser on the Mac
~iCreate
Is Safari unresponsive? There are some simple techniques to speed it up. Reduce the amount of work Safari has to do and you’ll be able to browse faster. Installing an ad blocker can help, as can removing unnecessary extensions.

1. Block web ads — Click Safari>Extensions to open the catalogue. Install an ad blocker like AdBlock, AdBlock Plus or Ghostery to block ads. When ads are not displayed, web pages load faster.

2. Uninstall extensions — Few extensions speed up Safari and ad blockers are an exception. Some slow it down, so go to Safari>Preferences>Extensions. Select unnecessary extensions and uninstall.

3. Remove shared links — Select View>Show Shared Links Sidebar. items here add to the work Safari must do and removing them boosts performance.Click Subscriptions and delete away.

Use Hot Corners in MacOS
~iCreate
MacOS has an unfair reputation for not being customizable, but sometimes you just need a gentle nudge to realize that you can make your Mac work exactly how you want it to. Failing that, a trip to System Preferences is always well recommended. Take Hot Corners as an example. You might have heard of this macOS feature, but are you actually using it? Probably not. Hot Corners enables you to perform a multitude of functions when you move your mouse’s cursor into one of the four corners of your screen. The Hot Corners feature is hidden in System Preferences. To find it on MacOS Sierra, go to System Preferences>Mission Control and click on the “Hot Corners” button in the lower, left corner.

Our Favorite Hot Corners:
1. Desktop — If you’re a Mac user that keeps files on their desktop, having the ability to wipe away all other windows and access your desktop instantly is going to save you closing down every other window you might have open.

2. Notification Center — Your Mac’s Notification Centre contains a plethora of information about what needs your attention and what you’ve got coming up. Use it as a Hot Corner to get that info without clicking anything.

3. Application Windows — Having the Application Windows action activated will give you access to all open windows from the app you’re currently using. Great if you’re working on multiple Numbers spreadsheets, for example.

Prevent accidental actions: If you have activated all four corners of your Mac’s screen with actions, you will find that you action tasks accidentally throughout the day. This is frustrating, but there is a workaround using modifier keys. This means you have to hold down a key of your choice (like Command, Shift or Alt/ Option) when you head to a corner to activate a task. Without this key

pressed, nothing will happen. Here’s how it works.

How to Get the Flag Icon Back in Mail on iPhone
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
I don’t know if you’ve noticed but Apple ditched the flag icon in Mail. When you flag an email, an orange dot appears next to the flagged message, instead of the good ol’ flag icon. If you’d prefer to get the flag icon back, you can easily do so in Settings. Likewise, if you later decide you preferred the dot, you can use this top to switch back. Here’s how to get the flag icon back in Mail on iPhone:

* Open the Settings app. * Tap Mail.
* Select Flag Style.

That’s all there is to it. Now you’ll see a flag icon next to mail you’ve flagged. Personally, I find it easier to spot the flag icon when scrolling through mail, but you’ll figure out what your preference is.

How to Disable Press Home to Open with iOS 10 on iPhone
~iPhone Life Tip of the Day
With iOS 10, press Home to open means you have to click the Home button to actually navigate to your Home screen. You’ll see at the top of Lock screen, when you use Touch ID, it will say Unlocked but it won’t open to Home until you press your Home button. And if you have Raise to Wake disabled, unlocking your iPhone takes two presses of the Home button. Press Home to open can be disabled in Settings by turning on Rest Finger to Open. Here’s how to disable press Home to open with iOS 10 on iPhone.

* Open Settings.
* Tap General.
* Select Accessibility.

If you have Raise to Wake on, you won’t need to press Home button to open Home screen at all. Simply place your finger on Home and Touch ID will open your iPhone. If you don’t have Raise to Wake on, a single press will open your iPhone just as it did before iOS 10 was introduced.

Mary’s X Files, March 2017

Dictate Rather than Type
~MacLife
We’re great fans of Nuance Dragon (nuance.com), but don’t forget macOS has dictation built in, which you can enable in the Keyboard preferences pane. Invoke it by pressing the function key twice.

By default, voice recordings are sent to Apple’s server for transcription, which returns written words to your app; enable Enhanced Dictation if you prefer it to be done on your Mac.

Cross-device Clipboard
~MacLife
In Sierra and iOS 10, you can copy something on one device and paste it on another; each must have Bluetooth and Wi-Fi on, be signed in to the same iCloud account, and have Handoff enabled (in System Prefs > General and Settings > General > Handoff ). This can take a few seconds to sync, so if your first attempt to paste fails, wait a moment and then repeat.

Tweak the Menu Bar
~MacLife
Previously you could move only some of the icons at the right end of the menu bar.

In Sierra, by holding the command key, you can drag almost all of them into whatever order you want. This includes Spotlight, which used to be fixed in place. Notification Center remains the exception; it’s pinned at the far right, though this makes sense given the feature slides in from the right.

To remove an item provided by Apple, hold the command key, drag the icon downwards and let go when a cross appears. For third-party items, look in their menu or their app’s preferences.

Control Passwords in iCloud Keychain on Mac
~iCreate
How can I control which passwords are shared in iCloud Keychain? You can manage your passwords using Safari on your Mac. Open Safari’s Preferences and choose the AutoFill tab. You might have to input your Mac’s administrator password, but once you’re in you’ll see every website with an associate password. Click one to see the login details for the website – you can then get rid of any that you don’t want to sync by clicking “Remove” in the bottom right. A few minutes later they should be removed from your other device.

Quickly close all tabs in Safari in iOS 10
~iMore
Want to clear everything currently open in your browser in a hurry? Tap and hold on the Pages button in Safari, and you’ll get an option to close all your tabs at once. (Note that this won’t clear your history — you’ll have to go into the Bookmarks section for that.)

How to Get Siri to Announce Incoming Calls with iOS 10
~iMore
With iOS 10, Siri can announce incoming calls. When the iPhone has an incoming call, Siri will let you know who is calling out loud. This iOS 10 feature is an accessibility feature but it’s also helpful when you’re running, biking, or keeping your iPhone in your pocket. Luckily, unlike some other iOS 10 features, Siri announcing incoming calls isn’t limited to newer iPhones. Here’s how to get Siri to announce incoming callers with iOS 10.

You can choose to have Siri announce incoming calls always, with headphones and in the car, with headphones only, or never. It’s a fairly easy change in Settings that will make sure you don’t miss important calls when you aren’t looking at your phone. To get Siri to announce incoming calls with iOS 10:

  •  Open the Settings app.
  •   Tap Phone.
  •   Select Announce Calls.
    Choose the setting that works best for you: Always, Headphones & Car, Headphones Only, or Never.

iPhone keyboard tips 1: Quickly add symbols
~Macworld
You’ve probably been using your iPhone’s keyboard for ages without realising that it’s actually easier than you thought to add symbols to your messages.Instead of tapping once on the 123 button, once on your chosen symbol and then once again on the ABC button to go back to the conventional keyboard layout, you can do the whole thing in one gesture.

Tap and hold the 123 button, slide your finger to select the symbol you want to insert, then release. Once it’s been added, your keyboard will automatically revert back to the letters keyboard. One tap instead of three: that’s some serious time savings right there.

Oh, and while we’re talking symbols: hold your finger on the symbol for a second or two and you’ll see any alternative (usually related) symbols that the button can offer instead. The dollar key also offers pound, euro and yen symbols, for example.

There are many additional symbols hidden within your keyboard that you may never have discovered. Experiment!