Mary’s X Files, November 2017

How to save an email as a PDF on iPhone and iPad
~iMore
You can save an email as a PDF without 3D Touch. It’s just as easy and you can use it with iPhone and iPad!

If your iPhone has 3D Touch, you may already know that you can save an email as a PDF file using 3D Touch in the built-in Mail app. It’s really nice when you’ve got an email you want to save outside of your Mail app. You know, in case something happens to the email like it gets lost in your messy, messy inbox.

But what if your iPhone doesn’t have 3D Touch, or want to save an email as a PDF on your iPad? You can’t just firmly press on the email and have it magically turn into a PDF. You can, however, magically turn it into a PDF with a slightly different gesture. It’s both non-obvious and easy to so do. Here’s how.

Open the Mail app on your iPhone or iPadTap an email message that you want to save as a PDF. Tap the action button. The action button looks like a reply arrow (it’s also used to reply to or forward email messages). Tap Print to open the printer options.

Pinch open the thumbnail image of the first page of your email. If your email runs for more than a page, you can pinch open any of the pages. The Printer Options will be replaced with the PDF version of your email message. Tap the Share button in the upper right corner of the screen. Select the app you want to save or share your PDF-converted email to.

Thanks to the in-app sharing feature in the Mail app, you can do a number of things with your new PDF. You can send it to a nearby person using DropBox, save it to your Notes app, copy it to iBooks, and more. A lot of third-party apps support sharing and storing of PDF emails, too, like DropBox, Messenger, and Slack. The world is your oyster. Now go out there and turn some emails into PDFs.

Switch Apps using the Keyboard in iOS 11
~Cult of Mac
The app switcher single-handedly turns the iPad into a Mac replacement.

The iPad uses the same Command-Tab app switcher as the Mac. That is, hitting the tab key together with the Command key on a connected keyboard will bring up the app-switcher strip across the center of the screen.

It look a lot like the Dock, but it is, in fact, an icon-based list of your most recently-used apps, in order of most recent use. Keep the Command key held down while you tap Tab, and you will cycle through the list. Let go to launch the app.

You can also hit the tilde key to reverse the switcher’s direction, or even use the left and right arrow keys once the app switcher is up on screen (you still need to keep the Command key held down). You can even touch one of the icons to launch the app.

Siri Sets the System
~MacLife
Siri in macOS Sierra can do plenty of cool tricks, but undoubtedly the most useful is its ability to control common system settings.

You can ask Siri to turn down your display’s brightness, increase the volume and perform a number of other similar tasks.
It’s bound to save you a few click and will save you from switching tasks if you’re right in the middle of working on something important.

Create Text Shortcuts in macOS
~MacLife
When you’re in System PreferencesShow , if you go to the Keyboard pane and then click on the Text tab, you will be able to create your own text shortcuts. This means that if you regularly type the same words or phrases, you could save yourself a great deal of time by setting up a shortcut.

Simply click on the ’+’ icon to add a new shortcut, then type in the chosen shortcut (a much shorter version of what you intend to type) followed by the actual text you want to type. This is also a useful feature for saving time filling in application forms that require you name, title and address.

Show the Status Bar in macOS
~MacLife
While in Finder, select ‘View’ from the menu at the top and then click ‘Show Status Bar’. This will pop up a small bar at the bottom of the Finder window which details important information such as the number of files in the current folder and the amount of free memory available to you.

It’s a very simple feature, but one that you will likely glance at whenever you use Finder, because it can highlight potential memory problems. A handy shortcut for selecting this feature is to press “Command’ and the backslash ‘/’ button.